Frankenstein Quote Analysis

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Reading is a truly beautiful thing that lets people be taken into another world with intriguing characters that will sometimes leave us thinking for days. Joyce Carol Oates quote, “Reading is the sole means by which we slip, involuntarily, often helplessly, into another’s skin, another’s voice, another’s soul.” explains everything about reading. I have never read a quote that sums up reading more and that quote explains everything when it comes to reading with me. I can get so lost in characters and books that might leave me obsessed for weeks. The Tempest by William Shakespeare and Frankenstein by Mary Shelley are two tales that can draw a reader into a different way of seeing the world. Right in the beginning of The Tempest…show more content…
Frankenstein has a passion for science and finds himself going too far with science. By going too far with science he creates the Creature. Instead of being beautiful like Victor imagined, the Creature is abominable and grotesque. Victor is terrified by his creation and runs from the Creature. The Creature begins to hurt Victor is many ways. Science is something that should not be mixed with nature. Victor went too far with science, intermixing science and nature. When Frankenstein intermixed them, he got the Creature out of it and the Creature hurt his desperately. Some could say Victor got punished from intermixing nature and science, but we have to look through Victor’s perspective. Victor Frankenstein was just a man who loved science and it was his passion. Everyone has a passion and science was his. Sometimes our passions can make us do things we know we should not do. Victor did exactly that by going too far with his passion making the Creature. The book, Frankenstein shows readers to see through a different perspective. We learn to emphasize with Frankenstein and learn to understand that everyone makes mistakes. We sometimes just have to accept that people make mistakes and the book Frankenstein does that.
Both stories, The Tempest and Frankenstein, definitely make readers more empathetic. The Tempest shows us how to understand Prospero’s
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