Frederick Douglass And Freedom Analysis

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Frederick Douglass was a man who stood for a great cause during the afterbirth of our nation. Douglass, when grown, stood against slavery and for the liberty of all men, women, and children. Being a slave himself, Frederick Douglass was one of the first people to give a true account of the horrors of slavery and that the slaves, who at the time were believed to be happy; were not happy in the slightest. Douglass also fought for the right of the slaves to live their own lives as their masters had all authority over every aspect of their lives. The slaves had no liberties other than serving their masters, they were never happy, but the white men made false claims that they were, and their lives amounted to nothing as their killing was never amounted to anything other than something of common barnyard animals. This is all accounted by Frederick Douglass as he, unlike most other abolitionists, had…show more content…
As Douglass said in the seventh chapter in his book, he had learned of the word abolition and how it related to freedom and liberty. He learned of this by listening to other conversations about slaves who had run away, murdered their masters, or the like and heard it was from the ‘fruits of abolitions’. Douglass speaks about this instance because of the ferocity of the actions of those who would risk their lives to escape to the freedom of the north and the possibility of starting a new life. A consequent instance of Douglass speaking of his liberty is in chapter ten, in which, he prays to God as well as giving God a small damnation. In this section, Douglass criticizes God for cursing him and the African Americans to the hell that they must endure, but Douglass also begs him to save him, and he wished that, “... I were on one of your gallant decks, and under your protecting wing”( Douglass, 10). This shows that Douglass, as well as other slaves, wanted their
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