Frederick Douglass Childhood Essay

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Furthermore, Douglass 's early unhappiness childhood reflected an indictment of slavery, which exposed psychologically to physical impacted of slavery to slave children who lack of love of family. Although, Douglass was separate from his mother, he was raised and has been protected and raised by his grandmother, who took the parenthood responsibility to take care slave’s children whom parents were sold by the slave-owner in the slavery, his childhood not directly experienced the everyday violence of adult slaves. This shaped him was able to go beyond other slaves understand the different between a real person and slave. Douglass recalled the witness of his first slave masters, Captain Anthony, who was whipping Douglass’s Aunt Hester until “the…show more content…
By comparing his experience to the adult slaves who also worked in the fields, he pointed out slaves did not enjoy much privilege no matter they are children, adults and elder. They did the labor work all season, but received limited supplies and necessities; they lived under an extremely poor condition place, each covered a miserable blanket and sleep on the cold, dump flood in all season (Douglass, Chp 2). Slave children only had a long linen shirt all season and could not get enough to eat (Chp. 5). Adult slaves and the blood-related slave children of their masters were bought or sold by their masters. In south slaveholders’ mind, slaves were and tool of laboring for support slaveholders’ living. Slave masters only care about keeping slaves working for them as long as slaves can alive, and how much fortune and wealth slaves can bring to them according the amount labor they can do. Base on this, slave owners would “retire” or abandon, but not free any slaves who were too old to work and became less profitable for slave-owners, just as Douglass’s grandma. Meanwhile, their masters enjoyed whipping and mistreating them regardless of their action, but slaves had to endure their feeling and angry in order to survive, and not telling the truth about their masters. Slaveholders would not receive any punishment for murdering or whipping slaves to death when Douglass recalled the master
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