Frederick Douglass Hard Work

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“If there is no struggle, there is no progress” (Biography.com Editors). Frederick Douglass was a hard worker with all of his tasks, and did not stop until he reached his goal. Many people have reaped the benefits of Frederick Douglass’ hard work in contributing to the Civil Rights Movement. The road to his own freedom and position didn’t come easily, and he impacted lives with his words. His journey and experiences are amazing, as you will soon discover. Frederick was born in Tuckahoe, Maryland near Hillsborough which was twelve miles from Easton, in Talbot County (Douglass 15). When Frederick was born, he was separated from his mother, and it was rumored that his slave owner was his father (Douglass 16). Because he was separated at…show more content…
He completed his studies by bothering the little white boys. He would tell them that he could write better than them, and then he would write a simple word in the dirt. They would retaliate by writing something better, resulting in free lessons for Frederick (Douglass 41). When Frederick was twelve, he read everything he could get his hands on and quickly formulated an opinion about the world. He realized how wrongly slaves were treated and became depressed at the conditions they were put through. He often thought about committing suicide (Douglass 41). While Frederick was in this condition, his former master, Anthony, died and all of Anthony’s property had to be returned to be valued (Douglass 45). Frederick was sent back, to live with Lucretia and was there for a month before returning to Baltimore (Douglass 47). After his return to Baltimore, he was sent to Thomas, who thought Frederick was misbehaving. Thomas sent Frederick to Mr. Covey for a year, because it was known that Covey was a slave breaker (Douglass…show more content…
The three autobiographies that Frederick wrote are as follows: The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave; My Bondage and My Freedom; and Life and times of Frederick Douglass (Biography.com Editors). Douglass spoke on behalf of women’s rights and spoke to presidents about black soldiers and suffrage. Frederick also visited many countries to express his opinion on different matters. Three of those countries were Britain, Scotland, and Ireland (Biography.com Editors). Douglass agreed to visit Ireland because Richard Davis promised to publish one of his
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