Frederick Douglass Struggles

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Frederick Douglass was a substantial black leader during slavery and the Civil War. He was an abolitionist, author and activist. He believed in freedom and the rights slaves. Douglass discuss in his books the mistreatment and dehumanization of slaves. He reflects on the vicious beatings and the separation of the black family structure. Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey was born in Talbot County Maryland around February 1818; the exact date of his birth is unknown. His mother was a slave and his father was white, possibly a slave owner. Growing up he did not know much about his mother; she died when he was ten. He had one brother and two sisters. Douglass’ grandmother raised him until he was seven. Once he turned seven he was sent to …show more content…

Auld forbade Mrs. Auld to continue teaching him. Douglass was very persistent and continued to learn to read on his own with the help of the white kids in the neighborhood. He enjoyed the reading of the newspaper in which he bought consistently. Douglass spent several years with Mr. Auld; he was removed from Mr. Auld plantation and sent to Mr. Covey who was considered the slave breaker. He was known to break down the physical and mental being of slaves. There he was beaten and humiliated, to the point that Douglass could not take it any longer and stood up to the slave master. Covey tried to break him but Douglass did not give him the satisfaction of doing so. Once he left the ownership of Covey, Douglass worked for William Freeland where he worked in his shipyard. There, Douglass attempted several escapes. He was finally successful and escaped to New York at the age of twenty, with the assistance of Anna Murray who would later become his wife. Once he arrived in New York he declared himself a freeman. In New York, he obtained the name Douglass. After Frederick escaped from slavery, he returned to New Bedford, Massachusetts with his wife. There they had five …show more content…

He began to speak at abolitionist movement meetings; this is where he met William Lloyd Garrison. William Garrison was an abolitionist and the founder of the Liberator newspaper. Garrison was fascinated by how articulate and well-spoken Douglass lectures were. One of his most compelling lectures was his biography of a being a slave. Garrison and the attendees were intrigued. They found his speech riveting. Many were amazed to see an intelligent and eloquent black man speak with such heart and grace. Garrison asked if he would join the AASS (American Anti-Slavery Society), Douglass accept his offer and begin to speak around the country on the misfortune of slavery. He accompanied Garrison on a six-month tour of the United States. During these lectures Douglas endured great resistance and angry mobs. His speeches included such topics on the Christian approval of slavery, the black men inferiority to the white man and the mistreatment and freedom of

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