Frederick Douglass: The Father Of The Civil Rights Movement

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To save the blacks from never getting equal rights Douglass, a father of the abolitionist society joined the fight of the civil rights fight for equal rights and in his cost Douglass escaped from slavery. Years passed with Covey beating him, until Frederick fought back, and soon he gave up. He knew Covey being faint would give him the chance to escape. He would soon end the civil rights movement.
Frederick Douglass, known as the father of civil rights, was an abolitionist anti slavery writer who played a very big part in the civil rights movement of 1854 to 1868. Born into a world of slavery,Douglass drove himself to escape slavery and stop any others from going through it. His escape was planned for September 3rd of 1838. After taking freedom papers and a sailor suit from an African American seaman, he would hop the train to freedom and adventure. To escape Douglass knew he would have to pass by the conductor with his papers. It was hard since he looked nothing like the man in the paper, yet the conductor acted as if he didn’t care. Many imperfections also showed up in his plan, such as a
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He soon became one of the first black leaders in the 18th century. He decided to attack slavery and suffrage. His brilliance and determination of shaping America became a inspiration to many more Americans. He became a public speaker for Anti Slavery and started shaping America into a place of equal rights for black and women. He was in the society of abolitionist as a speaker and leader for 3 years until going to the civil war. In 1855 Douglass wrote and published his 2nd autobiography known as “My Bondage and Freedom”. Douglass also created many quotes written out through history to show true power, such as “It is easier to build strong children, than to rebuild weak men”. His second quote was “If there is no struggle there is no progress”.
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