Freedom Summer Thesis

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Freedom Summer appeared to be a voter registration project, which began in 1964. From passage of the Civil Rights Act to the expansion blacks voting in the south, it took time to achieve the desired effect. Since Freedom Summer was devised in Mississippi, its goals were to help African Americans register to vote, attend to the inequality matters such as education, and address the problem of disenfranchisement. The goals for this venture looked comprehensive, although Freedom Summer succeeded in accomplishing them admirably. An approach to such task began with the federal intervention to helping African Americans get voting rights , cruising smoothly into establishment of freedom schools, and challenging Mississippi’s whites’ delegates by…show more content…
Children attended segregated schools. The Freedom Summer campaign pointed out issues related to of racial segregation. It rectified this by establishing Freedom schools. “They assigned eight hundred volunteers from around the nation, mainly white college students to [...] improve education for rural black youngsters [...].” Ingeniously, volunteers were trained to protect themselves if they had problems while doing their job. “COFO ran workshops [...] and taught the volunteers [...].” The schools, in a way, showed, how racial inequality still existed, considering that “desegregation is difficult.” They taught from normal academic courses to those within African American history. It seemed controversial to include the volunteers, as organizers from SNCC believed that this might spark the development of at least some leadership between the whites and African Americans. “Many of the teenage boys were delinquents until Mickey [...] showed them that at least person would respect them if they began to fight for something important [...].” When the Freedom Summer campaign first started, volunteers quickly became accustomed to what they were seeing in several different places. This looked like it was some kind of a [...] transformation made somewhat easier by the heavy amount of work to be done in the [...] campaign.” Other than that, Freedom schools did everything possible to promote racial…show more content…
It was one out of several parts of Freedom Summer that succeeded. Until this new association came along, Mississippi had a “regular all white state Democratic Party [...],” which excluded African Americans. In 1965, the new Democratic Party decided to challenge the “seating of the all-white delegation.” This challenge was brought on because the violence and intimidation African Americans of Mississippi went through had to cease. The state’s current “attitude [...] has presented [some other organization, the] COFO with a major [...] decision. [...] the civil rights struggle has to continue, as it has for the past few years, [...].” At this time, Lyndon B. Johnson was president. He possessed the decency to offer a compromise, however, the MFDP ended up refusing it. Interestingly, Johnson was afraid of was losing the 1964 election. “The only thing that can really screw us good [...] [n]ow there’s not a damn vote that we get by seating these folks. “ For a long time, the MFDP continued to fight for the “disenfranchised” African Americans. Soon, a special convention took place in Mississippi. Members of MFDP challenged the right of the Mississippi Democratic Party’s delegation using a claim that the white regulars of the party were elected, simply speaking, illegally. Earlier, African Americans were not allowed to vote because of literacy tests and some poll
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