French Revolution Effects On Society

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The French Revolution and its effect on society It is important to have a power distribution - a government that governs society's economy, makes and implements laws - but one must take care not to oppress the rights of the people. Also, the ordinary people have - perhaps more than anyone else - something to have said. A country would not work without its people, and if they feel oppressed, an imbalance in the power distribution would arise, which might tip over as it has so many times before. It is often seen through history: society distributes power and rights unlike among "rulers" and "under-sows", and forgets that the relationship between these is what holds the country together in the first place. We saw it a thousand years ago and we…show more content…
Also in the French Revolution, examples of this were seen. What is the power that can make us move our ethical values and transform us into what we first tried to avoid? What are some rights we want so deeply - and how do they inspire us in the first place? Human nature has fascinated us for millennia. That would surely last for no longer, but the French Revolution rose ... The French Revolution is often seen as a bloody anarchic mess, and like many other revolutions, it ended at the end of replacing an authoritarian regime with an authoritarian regime. But even though the revolution was a mess, its ideas changed human history. In the eighteenth century, France was a beautiful and popular country, but society was structured in a way that gave rise to problems for the collection of taxes. They had a system we call "Ancien Régime" This benefited the few Frenchmen, as it meant that the people with money - the generous and priest - should not pay…show more content…
It was expected that they paid taxes, worked and waged war for the crown - even though they could hardly afford to provide for themselves. But philosophers like Immanuel Kant had begun to question the whole idea of religion. For the first time, the question of the resurrection of human nature and rights was questioned - could it really fit the king's right to wealth when the general would starve? How was it fair? The whole dramatic situation motivated the general people to make their own national assembly. They gathered in an indoor tennis hall where they swore the famous "Tennis Court Oath". Here they agreed that they would not give up before a French constitution had been established. They managed to abolish most of Ancien Régime as well as rewrite the rights of the system so that they were distributed more equally between the general, the nobles and the priests - the revolution would make an incredibly bad job of sticking to these rights, but the same could argue for many other seemingly successful revolutions. Back in Versailles, the people were still starving and a rumor had spread that Queen Marie Antoinette, saved grain in his
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