Freud Vs Erickson Analysis

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This assignment explores Erik Erickson's Psychosocial Development theory as well as Sigmund Freud's Theory of Psychosexual Development. With each comparative stage, I will provide a brief description surrounding Freud's version followed by that of Erickson's version. After defining both perspectives regarding the stages of development, I will draw comparisons and connections between the two theories. Through thoroughly defining and comparing both theories similarities, dissimilarities and influences we can easily determine what makes each theory unique. SIGMOND FREUD VERSUS ERIK ERIKSON Similarities and dissimilarities Both Freud's Psychosexual Theory and Erickson's Psychosocial Theory cover the issues surrounding the different stages we…show more content…
Firstly we will be focusing on Erikson’s theory of psychosocial development. He believes that the first stage of development plays out during the first year of life. This is based on the notion that as an infant grows, he/she will either develop a sense of mistrust or trust of individuals depending upon whether his/her needs for teething, food, comfort, and sleeping are met (Erikson, 1993: 33-41). He suggests that during this stage, an individual will not only gain a 'syntonic' or positive outcome in varying levels of 'trust' but will also obtain other essential virtues of " drive and hope " (Erikson, 1993: 33-41). However, we also have the "dystonic" outcome (mistrust), which a child can develop if the caregiver lacks the ability or resources to provide these basic needs (Erikson, 1993: 33-41).If a child develops too much ‘mistrust’ or ‘trust’ a maladaptation can occur which may lead to withdrawal or sensory distortion (Erikson, 1993:…show more content…
During this stage of development a baby does not possess a fully operating "Ego" from which the baby can draw conclusions on, thus the infant suppresses feelings or emotions in the "Id" if the infants sexual needs or desires are not fulfilled by the caregiver (Freud, 2010: 26-38). If this occurs (needs are not met) during the first five months of the "Oral Stage," an "Oral-Passive" character can develop (Freud, 2010: 26-38). This may lead to an "Oral-Passive" personality, which entails an individual to be very dependent on those around them and may eventually lead to oral fixations that might include drinking, over eating, or smoking (Freud, 2010:
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