Friar Lawrence Is To Blame For The Deaths Of Romeo And Juliet

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“A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life…” (Act 1, Prologue). Through history, there have been many tales of deep romance, but Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare stands the test of time. However, the reason for this extended popularity may be because of the end result, one in which both lovers, Romeo and Juliet, die. With so many variables such as their families’ enmity and the motivation of parent figures such as Friar Lawrence and the Nurse of Juliet, one question looms, who or what is to blame for the deaths of Romeo and Juliet? In most relationships, consent from the bride and groom’s parents is advised, however, this is not an average relationship, and with there being an intense enmity between the Capulets and Montagues, …show more content…

Firstly, by the Nurse creating plans for the two to meet frequently at Juliet’s balcony, and with Romeo making the trip and frequently professing his love for Juliet. Secondly, they help by creating and executing plans for the two to secretly get married (even though they have known each other for under 24 hours). This prohibited wedding could not have happened without the help of the Friar. With Friar Lawrence agreeing to marry the two, regardless of having second thoughts, he is taking a huge risk, one that partially pays off. “Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.” (Act 2, Scene 6) This sentence said by Friar Lawrence, when paraphrased, says that he senses that the wedding is being rushed, this is a gut-feeling that when looked back upon and thought through throughly, could have prevented many further …show more content…

By also assisting Romeo with a plan when he is banished from Verona, as well as continuing to help the two lovers meet when separated, Friar Lawrence is risking the spotting of the banned Romeo in Verona. However more importantly, they also help by creating a diversion to keep Juliet from marrying Paris, her parent’s choice of groom. By creating a plan in which Juliet fakes her own death by drinking a liquid provided by the Friar from his garden, more problems are eventually caused and faced. If this act (engineered by Friar Lawrence and the Nurse) had not happened, along with Friar John had not being able to successfully delivering the message for this plan, Romeo would not be shocked when given the news that his newly wedded wife has been found dead on her bed. This then causes Romeo to go to Juliet’s grave, where she lays unconscious. Seeing his wife is dead, Romeo then proceeds to kill himself with a poison that he happened to have with him at the time (likely one that he also had received from Friar Lawrence). Once this happens, Juliet then awakens from her unconsciousness and sees Romeo dead beside her. In shock that her husband has committed suicide using a vial of poison, Juliet attempts to follow suit and kisses Romeo’s lips, hoping to be exposed to the poison. “Thy lips are warm!” (Act 5, Scene 3) However, this act does not kill Juliet,

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