Friar Lawrence's Impulsive And Hasty Decisions In Romeo And Juliet

805 Words4 Pages

Shakespeare portrays both Friar Lawrence and Juliet as characters who make impulsive and hasty decisions throughout the book. Juliet is proven to be naive because she immediately falls for, and marries Romeo, and she agrees to an unintelligent plan that the Friar impulsively comes up with. Friar Laurence is proven to be idiotic countless times, he marries the two children, and to keep the secret, he comes up with a devious plan, which ends up killing Romeo and Juliet. Juliet and Friar Laurence's foolishness is eventually the bane of Romeo and Juliet, the two constantly make hasty decisions which have dire consequences which influence many character in Romeo and Juliet. Juliet knows that her parents will not approve of her relationship with …show more content…

Juliet is saying that the one person that she loves is from the one family that she is supposed to hate. She is not oblivious to the fact that her decision to become involved with Romeo could end badly, as it did. Juliet rushes into marriage with Romeo, because she foolishly believes that the two of them are in love, though, they’ve only known each other less than a day. Juliet’s reaction after learning about her upcoming marriage to Paris is what ultimately leads to her and her lovers death. Juliet immediately tells the Friar that she would rather die than to marry Paris: “Oh bid me leap, rather than marry Paris” (4.1.7). Juliet feels as if death is her only way to go about without disappointing her parents, or breaking her vows with Romeo. She tells the Friar: “Do thou but call my resolution wise,/ And with this knife I’ll help it presently./ God joined my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands/ And ere this hand on thee to Romeo sealed/” (4.1.53-56). Had Juliet stopped to think for a moment, she would have realized …show more content…

He is the one who marries the two and gives Juliet the potion to drink, yet he does not ensure that Romeo is aware of the plan. The Friar marries Romeo and Juliet without their parents permission. He marries them, though he knows that it is wrong because they’re too young and barely know eachother, yet he ignorantly marries the two: “Come, come with me, and we will make short work,/ For, by your leaves, you shall not stay alone/ Till holy church incorporate two into one./” (2.6.35-37). Friar Lawrence is the one who gives Juliet the idea of taking the potion and persuades her to actually do it: “Hold, then. Go home, merry. Give consent/To marry Paris. Wednesday is tomorrow./Tomorrow night look that thou lie alone./ Let not the Nurse lie with thee in thy chamber./Take thou this vial, being then in bed,/And this distillèd liquor drink thou off,/” (4.1.92-97). Friar Lawrence convinces the naive Juliet to take the potion and pose as if she was dead. He wants her to go through with it because it means that no one will find out that he secretly married the two young lovers. No only does Friar Lawrence marry Romeo and Juliet, and persuade her to go along with his plan, he also fails to ensure that Romeo is made aware of the plan: “Who bare my letter, then, to Romeo? / … Unhappy fortune! By my brotherhood,/The letter was not nice but full of charge,/ Of dear import, and the neglecting it/ May do much danger. Friar

Open Document