Slopes Like White Elephants Literary Analysis

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Correspondence is the way to building a solid establishment of trust between a man and lady. In Ernest Hemingway's "Slopes Like White Elephants" we find out about the correspondence breakdown, between a lady named Jig and her friend who is an American man. They should settle on a choice that will influence both of their lives, and conceivably end their relationship. The setting of the story speaks to Jig and her association with her American partner. "The slopes over the valley of the Ebro were long and white. On this side, there was no shade and no trees and the station was between two lines of rails in the sun" (Hemingway 224). "The slopes were white in the sun and the nation was dark colored and dry" (Hemingway 224). This story utilizes…show more content…
Jig sees her pregnancy as a positive experience other than a negative experience. She is deeply in love with the man. She would like to settle down and have a life with the man. Yes, “said the girl. “Everything tastes of liquorice. Especially all the things you’ve waited so long for, like absinthe” (Hemingway…show more content…
As per Hal Holladay: What is basic in this story, as in Hemingway's fiction by and large, is the unexpected hole amongst appearance and reality. The apparently trivial discussion here about slopes and drinks and an unspecified task is in reality an implied however unequivocal battle about whether they keep on living the clean, liberal, wanton life favored by the man or choose to have the child that Jig is conveying and settle down to an ordinary at the same time, in Jig's view, fulfilling, productive, and serene life. Throughout the story you can compromise as a couple in a relationship, but deep inside of two individual people, they may want their life different from what the other person may want. To have a baby is expensive to raise. The man impregnated Jig and he doesn’t want to take care of the child. The man wants to be free from responsibility. He thinks an abortion is a way out of this problem. Jig wants to make the man happy, but her as well. She knows that her decision doesn’t only affect her, but everyone who is in her situation. Jig's reference to white elephants could be in reply to the baby. The American could see the baby as a white elephant and not want to raise it because of the cost, while Jig could see the child as an extraordinary addition to her mundane life of drinking and mindless traveling. Ernest Hemingway is bringing you into Jig and the man’s
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