Gamification In Talent Assessment

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Chamorro-Premuzic, Winsborough, Sherman, and Hogan (2006) present a vague and lacklustre support for the implication of Gamification within talent assessment. Although, they provide innovative and well thought ideas regarding how Gamification can be used to develop and modernise the talent assessment sector, they struggle to ground their theory with any evidence. Furthermore, by giving evidence for how individuals who find their niche, in which they do not need to try as hard to perform well, compared to those who haven’t found their niche, they are giving evidence against a style of talent assessment that is extremely generalizable in Gamification, as everyone must compete in the same game to be fairly judged and compared, even though some…show more content…
Because Gamification predominately involves games or competition, it can lead to employees or potential employees not taking their jobs or assessments seriously, and therefore going from a professional culture, to a game and play culture (Van Roy. R., & Zaman. B., 2015). Furthermore, one of the main causes of this change in culture is due to ‘trial and error,’ (Buckley. P., & Doyle. E., 2014) something which is seen heavily in games, where they can retry the assessment or task with zero consequences. However, this cannot happen during jobs where professionalism must be kept at all times, if not there could be consequences, some as severe as life or death, such as when working as a Doctor or Judiciary. When working as a Doctor or Judiciary you can not simply bring someone back to life after you make a mistake. Therefore, Gamification must never be implemented within job sectors that affect any human being mentally or physically by direct actions caused by the employees. In addition, Gamification assessments should not be used within the medical field because, there are some things that happen in which even the most specialized and knowledgeable Doctors cannot explain, therefore any game type assessment will never be able to; firstly, judge someone on an experience that can only happen from first hand action, and secondly, create situations in…show more content…
Therefore, Gamification has not yet been fine tuned, thus there is more likely going to be mistakes in its early phase of implementation and therefore it should not be applied as an assessment on its own. Furthermore, Chamorro-Premuzic et al., (2006) does not state that the old techniques of talent assessment are invalid or of no use, and so we must ask ourselves, ‘if it’s not broke, why try and fix it?’ Is Gamification really worth all the trials and errors that will come through it, just so we are up to date with the latest
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