Gardner's Multiple Intelligence Theory

1175 Words5 Pages
The main idea of this theory is that knowledge should not be seen as a single general ability, but a combination of eight distinct forms of intelligence. Psychologist Howard Gardner at Harvard University in 1983 originally proposed the Multiple Intelligences (MI) theory . He defined eight measures of multiple intelligence: linguistics, logical- mathematics, visual-spatial, interpersonal, intrapersonal, musical, bodily-kinesthetic and naturalist. (Armstrong, 2007; Gardner, 1983). According to MI theory individuals differ is in the strength of these intelligences. Each of our individual "profiles" of intelligence combines uniquely. People then differ in their abilities to carry out different tasks and solve diverse problems, and progress in…show more content…
The principal interest in the theory came from educators. Until today MI theory is applied into education. Moreover, no scientific theory can be translated directly into educational applications because education is suffused with values. So there are researchers supporting MI theory. In a research done by Gangi.S,2011. To differentiate effectively instruction in the elementary school classroom Gardner's MI theory is one of the method. It allows teachers to approach a lesson in a variety of ways. Gangi (2011) also pointed out in the research that there is a significant amount of data that indicates using MI in the elementary classroom will lead to greater student achievement. Studies show that when teachers teach to students' strengths, the learning needs of students are more closely matched, students are more engaged in learning, and their achievement levels increase As Campbell and Campbell (1999) pointed out, MI offers teachers a new way to look at students. Often, teachers view their students' skills as lacking in one way or another. However, when using MI, teachers view their students as skilled in their stronger intelligence areas and they use those areas of strength to teach students new content. Thinking of students in terms of their strengths also lends to having higher expectations for…show more content…
One striking result was that the eight “intelligences” were highly intercorrelated with each other, contrary to the theory that they are all supposed to represent separate and unrelated domains. This would suggest that people who scored themselves highly in one domain also tended to score themselves highly in several others. Openness to experience and extraversion in particular were each correlated with five different intelligence scores respectively (but not all the same ones). Gardner's Multiple Intelligences are cognitively based. Chen (2004) claimed that MI theory better accounts for cognitive skill profiles of typical
Open Document