Gardner's Theory Of Multiple Intelligence Theory

7030 Words29 Pages
Chapter-1 INTRODUCTION & CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK 1.0 INTRODUCTION: Intelligence is a word that describes ability of an individual to perform desired tasks well Over the years many people have come up with their own idea of intelligence which is based upon what they felt important. It has been a trend in the past for people to think that intelligence is correlated to academic achievement. According to it intelligence can be defined as the ability to perform well at linguistics, mathematics, logic and other school based academics. But recently there has been a switch to include a wider range of things in the definition…show more content…
It was first published in his book ‘Frames of Mind : The theory of Multiple Intelligence.(1983)’ Gardner challenged the notion of ‘g’ and gave a broad base to the concept of intelligence and its measurement by providing a multiple frame. He asserted that human intelligence can be best described as a set of individual’s multiple abilities related to a multiple number of domains of knowledge in a particular cultural setting .Elaborating his pluralistic view of intelligence he concluded that there are nine types of intelligence and each one is relatively autonomous and capable of functioning independently of the others. They are Linguistic, Logical-mathematical, Spatial, Musical, Bodily-Kinaesthetic, Interpersonal, Intra-personal, Naturalistic, Existential etc.. Linguistic Intelligence is responsible for all kinds of linguistic competence –abilities which can be best broken down into components like syntax, semantics, pragmatics, written or oral expression and understanding. This type of intelligence is most visible in lawyers, lecturers, writers and…show more content…
However, their self-esteem is also vulnerable to the perceived risk of an imminent anti-feat (such as defeat, embarrassment, shame, discredit), consequently they are often nervous and regularly use defence mechanisms. A typical protection mechanism of those with a vulnerable Self-Esteem may consist in avoiding decision-making. Although such individuals may outwardly exhibit great self-confidence, the underlying reality may be just the opposite: the apparent self-confidence is indicative of their heightened fear of anti-feats and the fragility of their self-esteem. They may also try to blame others to protect their self-image from situations which would threaten it. They may employ defense mechanisms, including attempting to lose at games and other competitions in order to protect their self-image by publicly dissociating themselves from a 'need to win', and asserting an independence from social acceptance which they may deeply desire. In this deep fear of being unaccepted by an individual's peers, they make poor life choices by making risky
Open Document