Gender And Gender Competition In Sarah Glaspell's Trifles

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The world is divided into two sets of individuals: male and female. While there are many variances between each gender, it seems that competition is the most important aspect of both sides. Men want to be better than women, but women know they are better than men. Who is stronger, who is more intelligent, who is always right, and who should lead the household are a few arguments most men and women bicker about in regards to his or her sex. This idea of dominance and gender-outdoing-gender often causes many problems. As a result, the majority of roadblocks that have gotten in the way of success for centuries have a root in gender competition, and this is evident in Sarah Glaspell’s 1916 play, Trifles. Although the murder of Mr. Wright is the headline for Trifles, the issue that inhibits the discovery of the felon and drives the plot is the conflict of genders. In the exposition of Trifles, the women have an emphasis placed on their looks and actions inside of the house, unlike the men. The first set of stage directions closely defines Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters by their appearances, while the men are simply noted as “bundled up” (601). Although this is so small that many people in the audience overlook it, this detail shares a great deal in the significance of the play. Just as the women are examined more closely, they also pay more attention to the detail of the crime scene where John Wright had a rope knotted around his neck. While the Sheriff, Mr. Hale, and the County

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