Tannen Gender Role Theory

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This chapter begins with the definition of gender role theory, that is a philosophy based on the assumption that males and females in society have an inclination to live up to approved roles based on anticipations on how males and females ought to act in society, and that they will be judged differently for the same actions. This has created stereotypes on both men and women, not only based on their behaviors, but appearance, personalities, skills, and characteristics. Many research stated that due to the expected role of behaviorism, many communication between relationship between both sexes had taken to a huge fall, because of the difference between reality and the constant changes of attitudes with the developments.(Henley and Kramara,1991;…show more content…
As Tannen has been mindful so as to note, it is not that customarily masculine men are unconcerned about their level of closeness or association with others; nor is it the case that generally female ladies are unconcerned about their level of force or status with respect to others. Maybe, the distinction is one of prominence and need: The masculine nature is to take care of the status and force suggestions of a social trade before considering its suggestions for solidarity and closeness, while the female aura is to do the converse is to take care of the status and force suggestions of a social trade before considering its suggestions for solidarity and closeness, while the female characteristic is to do the conversing .(Sidanius et al., 1991, pp.…show more content…
Upset, 1960) "maintains that differences in the sociopolitical attitudes of men and women can be largely accounted for by the different kinds of organizations in which men and women spend most of their time" (p. 136). If cultural practices recruit males into the workplace but keep females at home, males will have more opportunities to learn about status, competition, and power, whereas females will have more opportunities to learn about nurturance and caretaking. (3) The oppression model (e.g., Henley, 1977) argues that traditional gender roles are cultural products that both reflect and help to maintain men 's power over women. (4) The individuation model, inspired by psychoanalytic theory (Chodorow, 1978), assumes that when women are the primary caretakers, male children will tend to become more autonomous whereas female children will tend to experience more identification with
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