Gender Discrimination

1667 Words7 Pages
Given the almost equal percentage of opportunities for both men and women, it has been noted that men seems to have more consistent career than women. There are multiple theories and arguments presented to explain the observed gender gap in career achievements and experience. There might be many reasons for this discrimination including men dominating society, more opportunities or men, percentage of men who are confident about their skills and abilities is more than those of women and so on This theme has been discussed worldwide, McWhirter(1997) examined gender and ethnic differences in perceived educational and career carrier among 1,139 Mexican American and European American high school juniors and seniors. Result of this investigation…show more content…
According to (Burt, 1992, Linehan, 2001), their studies and research have acknowledged the importance of formal as well as informal networking of socializing toward their career advancement. Furthermore, the difficulties women are facing in accessing these networks may result in difference in promotion opportunities for men and women. In most of the studies, researchers figured out that women gain psychological as well as career-development support from mentors which may help them to overcome large number of barriers to advancement in their careers (Ragins,…show more content…
Gilligan (1982) describes how women development occurs in a process of intimacy and interconnection in relationships and identifies a three-stage process of moral development with periods of transition between each stage. The initial stage is characterized by self-care motivated by a need for survival. Transition from this stage is triggered by criticism of being selfish. The next stage is dominated by self-sacrifice and caring for the needs of others with movement from this stage involving individuation and a need for self-care. The final stage focuses on a new concept of self that combines care of self and care of others. Belenky, Clinchy, Goldberger, and Tarule (1986) focused their research on understanding women's cognitive development, finding that women develop a "connected" way of knowing that is contextual, understands from another perspective, values experience, and connects concepts to personal events and knowledge. These new theories, which regard development as a holistic process occurring in a relational context, have implications for understanding women's career development and decision making (Crozier, in press). Women may prefer occupations that allow for the expression of their relational identity (Forrest & Mikolaitis, 1986) explaining why women, especially young women who may be in the second stage of moral development, as
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