Gender Differences In Children

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Parents don’t choose whether they produce a girl or a boy, but they choose to make them real ladies or gentlemen (Sandra Bartky). When children are born, they don’t know the difference between both genders, but with parents showing them the differences in every aspect of life, they end up being totally different. Parents thinks it is their duty to emphasize the gender of child by raising him or her according to the gender typecasts in the society. As a new baby, entering into a world where a lot is expected according to the gender, the only thing you do is to act normally like others whether you like it or not. The strongest influence on gender role development of a child occurs within the family setting, with parents passing on to their children…show more content…
According to the historian Jo Paoletti of Maryland University, babies had no color preference in the 1800s. In 1927, boys started wearing pink and girls blue. This was because pink was a strong color hence suitable for the superior sex-boys. On the other hand, blue expressed delicacy which was one of the society’s assumptions from a woman (ladies ' Home Journal article in June 1918). In 1940s boy changed to blue and girls pink till now. This is because Blue represents the sky-open spaces, freedom and it’s associated with intelligence, importance and stability. Pink, on the other hand, represent something sweet, beautiful and clean. Baby colors’ preferences has no biological significance; it was socially constructed as it was being changed overtime. It was done by people to educate a baby girl from the start that she is very different from her baby boy counterpart as blue and pink are two divergent colors. Parents want to develop a spirit within girls that they have to be pure and submissive. For boys, they are the ‘heir’ of the family and they have to protect their sisters, so they have to be strong, intelligent and…show more content…
A girl is successful, if she is pretty and marries a billionaire. A boy is successful, if he’s intelligent and rich. Boys are born to be the legend, and to protect the name of the family. Girls are born to get married in a good and prestigious family for her parents to get credits for raising a good wife. Early in development, parents provide experiences that encourage assertiveness, exploration and emotional control in boys in order to be prosperous. In contrast they promote imitation, dependency and emotional sensitivity in girls in order to be alluring to his future husband (Berk, 2000). When a girl is two, they start enrolling her into beauty contests, but a boy of the same age is enrolled in a junior sports team. Girls are encouraged to play with dolls and tea sets and boys are encouraged to play with cars and footballs (Berk, 2000). Parents want to show their sons that they can be wealthy and buy all they want, but for girls, they want to show them that their role at home will be taking care of their children. All this influences children because they grow up, acting according to their parents suppositions for success. These rigid inferences limit children from going out of the box of their gender
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