Gender Roles In Advertisements

1395 Words6 Pages
When taking a look at modern society, it is not so unusual to see women working outside their houses and some are even in charge of important positions. However, it was not too long ago that women started to obtain rights equal to men. Back in 1848, Seneca Falls Convention was held in New York and women’s rights activists claimed for equal rights (Vogelstein). After this convention, people around the world took actions to fight for women’s rights, especially in the United States. As a result, women in the United States won voting rights in 1870 and eighty years later, the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Right (Vogelstein). As women gained various rights that they did not have before, they came to earn more opportunities.…show more content…
Out of many areas, the field of advertisement was chosen as a research target because advertisements are considered as a very influential type of media that is strong enough to shape one’s dominant desires and values (Cheon and Kim, 1). In other words, it can be said that the whole society’s values and attitudes are heavily affected by advertisements. Not only does the advertisements sculpt social behaviors, but also reflects the changes in the reality. Therefore, they are sometimes characterized as a mirror that reflects the social and cultural changes (Cheon and Kim, 1). Given how intimately advertisements and the society are related, analysis of advertisements is relatively an effective way to find out whether social changes are reflected in such an influential…show more content…
The five advertisement samples were taken from 1900 (Image 1), 1930’s (Image 2 and Image 3), 1940’s (Image 4), and 1950’s (Image 5) so that changes over long span can be examined. These five images are attached behind the reference list, which follows after this essay. Even though there was a vast number of Coca-Cola advertisements to choose from, this analysis mainly focused on advertisements that include female figures, with the exception of the advertisement from 1900 (Image 1). To examine whether gender stereotypes have changed along with the times, each individual advertisement was first semiotically analyzed using guidelines such as the appearance and position of the female figures, the setting in general, and the text in the advertisement itself to measure the degree of existence of stereotypes. Then, from that result, it was concluded whether there was change over time in how female figures were drawn in Coca-Cola’s paper
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