Gender Roles In Bomba Cinema

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Abstract: This paper attempts to understand the evolution of powerful women role models in Bomba Cinema. By delving into the socio-cultural framework and power structure of men and women in India, we study the changing landscape of Bombay Cinema. Using secondary sources from the field of sociology, gender studies, literature we explore the gender representation of women in media and their issues highlighted. The paper takes a twofold approach- first by understanding how gender is represented through cinema we establish its link with the concept of social desirability and how women viewed as an outcast is slowly changing. Second we explore the transition in the damaging images of a woman to a strong, immanent powerful one and how it has affected…show more content…
Cinema is indubitably one of the most popular art mediums and has the ability to influence beliefs, perceptions, thought processes, construct new images, emphasize on inculcating virtues and dissolving vices pertaining to a specific culture. Through the lens of a movie, a person can attach and detach themselves to the roles played by characters, internalize the theme and understand its significance if any. Studies on gender roles in media show that women are underrepresented in movies, and that they are represented in a different way than men. (Carter & Steiner 2004). This paper attempts to contrast gender representation in India’s socio-cultural framework and power structure with changing landscape of Bombay Cinema. Socio-religious beliefs, influence of Hindu epics like Ramayana and Mahabharata, myths, legends, superstitions, societal practices, rites and rituals all have contributed in shaping the ideal woman in Indian societies. The patriarchal fabric of India ensures that all these factors constantly remind women that their role in the society both urban and rural settings is…show more content…
The women in these movies are portrayed seductively to the extent that they objectify themselves through such songs. Women objectifying themselves are notably the most damaging image; their self-worth is hence reduced to being a passive sex object. Now, according to Rao, these men are given license to imagine, beneath the demure sari, the sexual delights which the heroine displayed and promised when, as an unmarried youngster, she cavorted in “itsy bitsy fluff” or “disported in diaphanous saris under waterfalls” (1995: 243). Commercial Cinema reinforce very oppressive patterns of thought and self-image for women that comes across in Rao’s essay as most deeply
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