Gender Biases In A Midsummer Night's Dream

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Biases have been formed towards the relationships between men and women for the bulk of time. Privileges of the men differ a great deal from the privileges of women, when it comes to roles both genders play in their everyday lives. Expectations, celibacy, and dominance are key factors that play into relationships between men and women. All of which tend to be typical male intentions, and if a female reaches out to a male she is thought of as a desperate, slut. Relationships are important for one to acquire at some point in life, though difficulty sets in immediately upon the women being forced to stay in a submissive state. A Midsummer Night’s Dream portrays the ideas of gender specific roles with men being assertive and women being meek when…show more content…
Refraining from a physical relationship is often not thought of when pondering the times A Midsummer Night’s Dream occurs in. Celibacy is remaining in a state that practices abstinence from marriage and sexual relations. However, the characters in this play were looking to have advanced relations, and their guardians are not attached to this idea. It is rare to see a man that is not wooing women for their love, for they are the only ones expected to do so. Dominance and submission are the main traits of the men and women of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. A Midsummer Night’s Dream portrays the ideas of gender specific roles with men being assertive and women being meek when it comes to relationships expectations, celibacy, and dominance, furthermore these roles have been the norm for some time. In the end readers begin to understand the ideas of gender specific roles, and the ways men and women get treated because of their abilities. Men come off as the strong, independent characters, whereas women are meant to be submissive and if anything but that they are thought of as a desperate, slutty young lady. A Midsummer Night’s Dream portrays all aspects of relationships, while teaching readers values expected involving partnership with

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