Gender Roles In The Jacobean Era

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Shakespeare’s Macbeth has had a significant relevance throughout modern contemporary society. Macbeth is still relevant to today’s audiences moderately due to human nature being similar to that of the Elizabethan, Jacobean era. The play’s themes still relate to modern society for example: guilt, anxiety, hierarchy, ambition, power and gender. Over time Disney films have become well known for the concept of Gender roles both male and female, the female being the weaker sex. Disney princesses have usually been shown through a traditional fairy tale concept, the damsel-in-distress in need of help and to be back but in line. These films represent the ideologies of gender which originated from the play Macbeth. However Frozen both challenges and reinforces the traits of a typical…show more content…
Jennifer Lee and Chris Bucks Frozen, astutely represent the theme of gender by both reinforcing and challenging the concept through the use of aesthetic features and characters. The representations of gender and the expectations of women throughout the Jacobean era have had an influence on contemporary modern society represented through film and Tv. Being truthful, all-encompassing free is something that human beings crave but are actually extremely terrified of, think about it what is the one thing as females hold us back, the chains of social conditioning, and the unpleasant hierarchy of gender roles. This can be seen with the character of Lady Macbeth, her expectations as a wife are tested when her own values and beliefs begin to surface with her masculine principles taking over. In relation to Frozen, Elsa the older sister, can be identify in the same manner as Lady Macbeth. Challenging her expectations of a female queen, when her supernatural influences begin to become uncontrollable where she releases from the pressures and allows herself the freedom to make mistakes and live how she chooses. Elsa’s struggle to accept her tremendous powers

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