Gender Stereotypes In Disney

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Introduction Disney Waltz Company is a well-known brand in the entertainment industry which focuses on young girls mainly. Its princess franchise has become world phenomenal and influential among the girls due to the exhilarating line story depicted in every movies. In 2009, Disney managed to raise 4 billion of profits through its products sold from the princess franchise (Johnson 2015), proving itself as the leading brand among kids. The insertion of moral values has gained the acceptance of parents towards Disney movies as their kids’ main entertainment (Nussbaum 2016). Despite the tremendous response from society, Disney movies are commented to affect the level of confidence of young girls by some sides. The princesses are stereotyped with…show more content…
Majority of the company’s staffs were conquered by male in the early productions and said to create movies based on society without considering the gender biasness inside the films (The rhetoric of Disney). As time passes, many women are employed into the company and manage to vocalise the importance of gender portrayal which then lead to the breaking of princesses’ stereotype in their new movies. In Brave, Princess Merida is designed with a more normal body size. Saladino (2014) observes that Merida is characterized with more abilities and intellectual traits rather than beauty and lifting female character into a higher standard than the previous movies. For example, Merida shows some rebellion towards her mother who are stressing her the definition of…show more content…
Subverting the princesses’ norm clearly shows that Disney is listening to the remarks from parents. Despite this push forward, in Frozen, Anna and Elsa’s wrists are still smaller than their eyes which is unconsciously promoting the definition of beauty among young girls. Disney also has caused a major disappointment among parents through the changes made on princess Merida look in a toy form. In the online website, Disney has sold Princess Merida products with an alteration in her body image with curvy waist and big eyes. Sperling (2013) states that the changes are aligned with the idealization of beauty in most of previous princesses. Brenda Chapman, the co-director and writer for Brave has publicly commented on the controversial makeover of princess Merida and labelled Disney action as atrocious. In twitter, many people critics that the makeover has changed the positive traits demonstrated in Merida. An online petition is created to protest against the image and manage to have 200000 of signatures in effort to convince Disney redesign the product. Following the complaints, Disney finally removed the new Merida image from their
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