Gender Stereotypes In Pop Culture

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Lisa Shaffer once said that much of what we see in pop culture, especially in promoting racial, ethnic, religious, sexual, or other values to different age groups is becoming more progressive than conservative, even though it is just defending traditional social values. In Men’s Men and Women’s Women by Steven Craig, the ideal viewers of publicizing and selling is what makes the “pop” in culture expand. Who could have known that there are other times of the day that advertisements are broadcasted just because of the target audience? Who could have known that advertisements including men and women are created to engage the distinct “statuses” of each gender? What about financial standing? Steven Craig’s point of view is about the gender of…show more content…
As one is able to realize in Women’s Women, it shows how by using the product Weight Watchers, it enables a woman to be closer to a male, increasing desire towards the opposite sex and helping enrich their beauty. While that is the description to the association that the commercial is displaying, what it is typically expressing is that women are always attempting to achieve and sustain physical image because an attractive figure identifies with men and appearance is also connected to wholeness in family, such as being comforted and loved. However, in Women’s Men, the particular man she is chasing for is a woman’s fantasy as he is the perfect man: handsome, passionate, sympathetic, and sensitive. With her women-related product, the women’s body is what enthralls the man. While women do want solidity in relationships, this advertisement attracts that what most women want, which is also connected to the product is by telling the audience that with “secret”, therefore, it makes them wanted. With that all being said, the distinction in beer and Weight Watchers commercials is the insight of the female. The reason being that in one advertisement, it comes across as a “fling” , whereas the other is a foundation for the relationship enduring after the commercial is

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