Gender Stereotypes In The Media

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GENDER AND THE MEDIA The media has a very powerful effect on culture, shaping societal structures and operations. Dominant media forms have heavily assisted in constructing gender and genderalized norms. Advertising and mass media forms display codes that are associated with representing male and female attributes. These gender codes shape the way in which society views gender and assists in determining what is acceptable gender performance. It is through media’s reinforcement of gender stereotypes, codes and gender displays that shape the way in which society perceives and constructs genders. Gender is not formed at birth, this self identification of being male or female is shaped through cultural, and social conditions. Media forms often…show more content…
Mass media projects gender stereotypes as models for the sexes to follow. Men within the media are constructed to be powerful aggressive figures, embracing financial stability and dominant control. Whereas the media projects women to be constructed as nurturing figures, concerned with family and sustaining feminine beauty. Often these gender assumptions cast negative representations that place barriers on women to develop and reach their true potential within society. As a result, Celica Benoit author of Women, Work and Social Rights states that gendered stereotypes have made it more difficult for women to be taken seriously within the workplace, adding that male colleagues are more respected in these companies for they are perceived to be more dedicated workers (Benoit, 72). Benoit’s findings indicate that the media’s influence constricts both men and women, as the sexes are forced to conform to gendered…show more content…
What adolescents see on MTV and rock music videos is highly stereotyped and slanted toward a male audience. In music videos, females are twice as likely as in prime-time programming to be dressed provocatively, and aggressive acts are often perpetrated by females. Gender stereotyping also appears in the print media. Females and males are portrayed with different personalities and perform different tasks, in children’s book (Matlin, 2004).Males are more likely than females to be described as passive, dependent and kind. They are more likely to cook and clean up. In one study, 150 children’s books were analysed for gender-role content (Kortenhaus & Demarest, 1993).It was found that frequency with which female and males are depicted in the stories has become more equal over past 50 years .The role played by females and males in the books has changed in a more subtle way. Girls are now being pictured in more instrumental activities (behaviour that is instrumental in attaining a goal), but in the portrayals they are as passive and dependent as they were depicted as being 50 years ago! Boys are occasionally shown as passive and dependent today, but the activities they are pictured in are no less instrumental than they were 50 years ago. However, with effort, parents and teachers can locate interesting books in which girls and women are presented as appropriate
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