Genocide To Gendercide

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Gendercide is a form of genocide that specifically targets a gender, usually committing crimes against the specific gender in different ways than they would another gender. Gendercide is a subcategory to genocide, which entails the specific targeting of a gender. While it is one of the “big three” missing from the Genocidal convention (political, social, and gender groups) it is non-the less an important targeting mechanism to conduct genocide and insure the destruction of a population (Jones 34). The variation of genocide to gendercide is blurred lines, meaning the two along with the other forms of genocide combine together to create genocide. Leading genocide export, Adam Jones believes that these forms of genocide never exist in isolation,…show more content…
During the start of the Armenian genocide “gendercide” was one of forms of mass killing that was displayed. In the initial phases of the Armenian genocide, all “battle aged” men were rounded up and sent away, to “fight”, or were outright killed, leaving virtually no men in the community (ArmenianBackground PP 20,26). This was an important tactic to the Turks, because by destroying the men-“gendercide”, it allowed them to strip the community of leaders and able war age men, leaving the Armenian women to suffer their own form of gendercide, which where we see is the context of the quote. By destroying the men, it left the remaining population virtually helpless, and allowed the Turks to do what they wanted with the remaining women, children, and elderly. This starts the second phase of gendercide committed by the Turks, and that was against the Armenian women. After losing all societal leaders, and men in the first wave of genocide, the majority of Armenian women were forced into death marches were less then 150 women survived (ArmenianBackgroundPP37). On these death marches, which are described in the quote, women were forced to walk through the deserts for miles…show more content…
Communism, and Marx’s philosophy insists on equality for men and women, and the societal struggle is instead focused on the class and societal status (GenderKhmerRogue 17). However, while men and women were seen as equals, and exposed to the same slave labor, starvation and the cruelties of the regime, women were still seen as weaker, and their tended to be a higher number of women in the notorious prisons S-21 (GenderKhmerRogue 18). An example of this is Chin Meth, former Khmer Rogue solider, who was forced into the regime along with the other children in her village. After working in the army she was sent to work in the rice fields, before being sent to the S-21 prison for rebelling, along with all of the other women in her group (CambodiaVideo). Women were sent to the prison in higher rates and then if they survived were sent to labor camps along side children where many died from the working conditions. While men primarily continued to fight in the war, women were sent to these camps were they were presumed to die. This is an example of how women and men were treated differently in Cambodia as well. Even a society that saw the two genders as equals saw the different destruction of the genders under the Khmer
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