George And Lennie Friendship Analysis

1040 Words5 Pages
Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck is a powerful book about a tight bond between two companions during the difficult and often unfair Great Depression. The two main characters and best friends are George and Lennie. Lennie is a little kid trapped in a large man’s body, forgetful, and stronger than he knows what to do with, while George is the mentally sharp, thoughtful planner. The two friends first appear in the book jobless and carrying their bindles to yet another worksight. From then on (and even in their recalling of the past) they have to overcome many challenges of their time by standing by each other’s sides throughout the book. Given Lennie’s mental disabilities and their common lack of work, George and Lennie have to stand together…show more content…
J. Steinbeck begins with George and Lennie on route to their new job during which they are introduced. As it reads on page 4, “They had walked in single file down the path, and even in the open one stayed behind the other. Both were dressed in denim trousers and in denim coats with brass buttons. Both wore black, shapeless hats and both carried tight blanket rolls slung over their shoulders.” This illustrates how their friendship had allowed them to grow alike and stand in situations very similarly. Again on page 10, Lennie expresses his idolizing of George when, “Lennie, who had been watching, imitated George exactly. He pushed himself back, drew up his knees, embraced them, looked over to George to see whether he had it just right. He pulled his hat down a little more over his eyes, the way George's hat was.” Lennie looks up to George as a role model and a close friend, so he is imitating him almost in a form of flattery and to be like him/ do right. Later on, during their journey, the night before they start their new jobs, Lennie asks for ketchup but after George’s reprimanding, he realized he is acting foolish especially considering the tough times. On pages 93-95 Lennie exclaims, "I was only foolin', George. I don't want no ketchup. I wouldn't eat no ketchup if it was right here beside me," and George responds "If it was here, you could have some," as Lennie…show more content…
Their co-workers and various acquaintances all approach their friendship with confusion and are skeptical of their true loyalty. In chapter two, when George and Lennie meet the boss he is skeptical of their relationship. Because the loyalty they possess was so uncommon at that time this really emphasises how vital their relationship was even under the bosses confused but powerful attention. Later in, on pages 39-40, Crooks was analysing to Lennie and seeming jealous of the special friendship of Lennie and George. He toyed, "George can tell you screwy things, and it don't matter It's just the talking. It's just bein' with another guy. That's all." Crooks was hinting at the value of their relationship and how because he has no power in an unjust society, a friendship like George and Lennie’s would be a dream come true. Later on a similar situation as the one with the boss occurs, though this time with the boss’ son, Curley. On page 82 he is skeptical of George and Lennie’s friendship, ’"We travel together," said George coldly. ‘Oh, so it's that way.’ George was tense and motionless. ‘Yea, it's that way.’” This illustrates how they stick-up for each other though many are suspicious of their helpfulness/kindness. This feeling of need to support each other through friendship is carried out through the entirety of their relationship. In conclusion,
Open Document