Global Warming: The Negative Effects Of Global Climate Change

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Introduction: One of the most complex and crucial concerns of contemporary times which is pervading across the globe, slowly decaying the roots of development all over and jeopardising the very existence and survival of mankind on this planet is the issue of global climate change. Climate change means significant differences in weather patterns over an extended period of time , and this occurs particularly owing to anthropogenic global warming. Article 1 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change defines ‘climate change’ as ‘a change which is attributable directly or indirectly to human activity that alters the composition of the earth’s global atmosphere and which is in addition to natural climate variability observed over…show more content…
An unstable and unsustainable environmental order brought forth by global climate change has become a potentially dangerous issue, for it has a direct bearing on development issues of mankind and poses a host of threats to the very survival of human beings itself. If global warming and consequent climate change is not checked, agriculture and food security is bound to be threatened; water insecurity is eminent as droughts and crisis of ground water is highly predicted; the rise in sea levels owing to increased glacial runoff would lead to the submergence of coastal areas and the salinisation of groundwater supplies; and invariably there would be huge loss of biodiversity with the destruction of the flora and fauna. And in addition to all these, one of the most devastating effects of climate change that is expected to be prominently visible in the long run is its detrimental impact on…show more content…
Expectant mothers are affected miserably as adequate nourishment is essential for a healthy gestation period. During pregnancy, the energy demand of women increases by approximately 20%, which also continues throughout the period of breastfeeding. But owing to poverty and the poor socio-economic status in societies it is always women who are fed less but ironically they work more. In fact, in addition to the household chores, the labour of women is doubly enhanced in terms of emergencies. For example during droughts, women need to walk long distances to fetch in and store water and in times of flood, it is women who work more in waterlogged areas. The increased calorie reduction and increased hunger make women malnourished which has serious implications on maternal health. Underweight women are more likely to give birth to children suffering from IUGR/low birth weight , which is considered a risk factor for infant morbidity and infant mortality. Underweight children are also more susceptible to infectious diseases such malaria, pneumonia, diarrhoea, etc, and there are increased chances of growth retardation and delayed mental development among these children including the greater risk for metabolic
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