Godfather Counterculture

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American counterculture was a reaction against United States government which oppressed domestic minorities and committed atrocities abroad. The emergence of a counterculture coincided with the dissatisfaction of many Americans with the actions of their government. Angry with capitalism, racism, and war, young people especially defied the American power structure, instead pushing for greater personal freedom, which included drug use, sexual freedom, freedom of speech, and peace. American counterculture was on display in Woodstock, the 1970 documentary film released a year after the festival. The film shows young adults flocking to a music concert in Bethel, New York, where they hear music performed by artists and groups including Richie Havens,…show more content…
He is forced to quit his job at the deli, but rises through the underworld, eventually becoming a crime boss. While he is unseated in Part 1 and dies of a heart attack far from the action, Vito achieves wealth and admiration from his city. While the American dream may not be perfect, Vito successfully moves up from a grunt to the most powerful boss in New York. Living a lawful life was impossible for Vito--it didn’t pay nearly enough for him to support his family. Opportunities in America did exist for him, though and he was able to prosper…show more content…
In Booker T. Washington’s speech “the Atlanta Compromise,” he admits the flaws in American race relations, but remains optimistic and presents an outlook for the American future. He reveals the differences in the well being of African Americans and White Americans, and points out that their work and lives will continue to be different. Despite these differences, he urges White and Black americans to live together. He asks Black Americans to accept that it will be difficult to improve their standing, but to concentrate on education instead of asking for an increase in positions and and social standing. Similarly, he asks White Americans to accept that Blacks will need time to become successful and that it is a process. Washington recognizes that America is deeply flawed, that African Americans endure prejudice and discrimination, and lack opportunities that are more easily accessed by White Americans, but he remains hopeful that these problems will be solved with time, trusting time to sort out problems of
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