Golden Frog Research Paper

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The Panamanian Golden Frog [scientific name- Atelopus Zeteki] is classified under the Phylum of Chordata, Class of Amphibia, Order of Anura and Family of Bufonidae. It is also commonly known as Carro Campana Stubfoot Toad, Golden Arrow Poison Frog, Golden Frog and Zetek’s Golden Frog. Molecular data and morphological, ecological and demographic analyses suggest that the Panamanian Golden Frog and their kin are comprised of five distinct forms. They are endemic to Panama and inhabit the streams along the mountainous slopes of the Cordilleran Cloud forests of West and Central Panama and the eastern side of the Tabasara mountain range in the Cocle and Panama provinces. Adult dry forest males measure 35-40 mm and weigh 3-5 g. Adult dry forest…show more content…
This ‘semaphoring’ is a behaviour they developed to communicate with each other because they live near fast- moving streams where audible calls may not be useful. The male Panamanian Golden Frog makes a whistling sound and at least two different types of calls. When grabbed, they produce a short chirp and call out for attention in soft trills. They turn in the direction of other frog calls. These frogs have no ears. They detect sound through their lungs which are located just beneath the skin and vibrate when sound waves hit…show more content…
These make the frog toxic to mere touch. The more the variety of invertebrates in its diet, the greater the toxicity. The frog produces a nerve toxin that hurts its predators. Research indicates that the frog produces a variety of toxins including steroidal bufadienolides and guadinium alkaloids. One of the latter variety, Zetekitoxin AB has been found to be a blocker of voltage dependent sodium channels. Its potency is of much more magnitude than its analog saxitoxin. These frogs wave at their predators too to warn them off. Their bright colour itself serves as a warning of their toxicity. The male frogs wave at potential female mates to attract their attention. The females wave to warn off the males. If the males persist, the females relent. If the predators keep approaching, the frogs wave even more vigorously. Though this serves as a deterrent in most cases, some predators are toxic enough to ingest the poison of these
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