Good And Bad Citizen In Othello

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My analysis extends here to the question of legitimacy; the border between good and bad citizen; to the double standards in dealing with subjects. Such notion denotes that even villains are at times and under certain conditions indispensable as long as they serve the purpose of the state. Alan Sinfield brings this idea to its ultimate utility in the discussion of Othello both as an outsider and noble. He asserts: "In respect of murdering state enemies, at least, he [Othello] was a good citizen" ("Faultlines" 34), and even "more by accepting within himself the state's distinction between civilized and barbaric." That is to say, when he brings to fore "the barbaric beneath" and murders Desdemona, he culminates the action by attempting suicide…show more content…
That "he had taken [in the colonies] to industrious habits, and had thriven lawfully and reputably" (417). This praise is viable only as far as his industry has helped the prosperity of British Empire abroad. The moment the man traverses in and takes up his old habits, he is regarded outlaw worthy of gallows. What he does is what London expects of him and what happens to him is what is best expected to happen; in Athusserian terms, he interpellates what London expects of him. His industry and efforts in the colonies is quite what London expects of a good subject. His abiding by the majestic rule at the declaration of verdict against him is interpretable in this light (this moment will be dealt with later in this…show more content…
The question of structural difficulty bears near relation to faultlines that state tries at all times to conceal from public view; that is, to draw a careful distinction "between the violence the state considers legitimate and that which it does not" (95). This is where literature comes handy. By similar analogy, Pip's first visit to London brings him face to face with state violence. He is shown, upon his entrance into metropolitan, into the Newgate Prison at the advice of Wemmick, "where the gallows was kept,… where people were publicly whipped, and … the Debtors' Door, out of which culprits came to be hanged." This showcase continues until Pip feels overcome by "a sickening idea of London" (152). As a result, the first idea of the uninformed reader about London, just as that of Pip, is a murky one. Such violence must necessarily be distinct, and of a legitimizing essence, in comparison with the rest of violence that the piece is characteristically over-brimmed with. "It is a definition of the state, almost, that it claims a monopoly of legitimate violence, and the exercise of that violence is justified through stories about the barbarity of
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