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Overcoming Stereotypes In The Scarlet Letter And The Crucible By Nathaniel Hawthorne

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As the crowd watches, Hester Prynn, holding an infant, walks down from the prison door and makes her way to the scaffold, where she is to be publicly condemned. Both The Scarlet Letter and The Crucible were intended to teach and instruct through didactic texts. The authors conveyed this through bringing attention to specific details and the decisions of the characters in their writing. Three lessons that were included in both the play and the novel were the overcoming of the stereotypes and bias of characters in The Scarlet Letter, the corruption of not only the ones who govern, but also susceptible to even the common citizens in The Crucible, and the perspective of faith and morality of the characters in the story who determine good versus evil through irony. First in The Scarlet Letter, we were taught by Hawthorne about overcoming the initial stereotypes and biases of specific characters in the novel including himself. The author uses slow transitions in the novel to change our The view and his portrayal of Hester. He also uses Hester’s character to compare and bring attention to himself. Hester in particular, is first described in the novel by Hawthorne as deviant…show more content…
The authors conveyed this through bringing attention to specific details and the decisions of the characters in their writing. Three lessons that were included in both the play and the novel were the overcoming of the stereotypes and bias of characters in The Scarlet Letter, the corruption of not only the ones who govern, but also susceptible to even the common citizens in The Crucible, and the perspective of faith and morality of the characters in the story who determine good versus evil through irony. Both works convey many lessons that can be interpreted in many different ways but are still universal and timeless. The lessons can also be applied to many situations in
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