Gothic Heroes In Frankenstein

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True heroes are troubled, confused, and often times very lonely; furthermore, they don’t always do what is considered “right.” Sometimes emotions get the better of them, and sometimes their emotions puzzle them because they have no control over the powerful feeling that inundates them. Heroes aren’t perfect or even the most expected of characters because all heroes cannot be placed into one category. Many types of heroes exist, and some can even be the best of villains. This is exactly what Mary Shelley exhibits in her gothic novel, Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus, through the development of gothic heroes who share these traits. Shelley does this by using many allusions to make clear the character actions and thoughts throughout the story.…show more content…
This further assists readers in understanding the state of mind of the creation and the reason behind his contradicting and sometimes confusing actions. Throughout the novel, Shelley references Genesis as Frankenstein creates his monster, as well as when the creation dwells on his emotions to persuade Frankenstein to help him. The creation starts off his existence by relating himself to Adam, but as he continues his cursed journey, he realizes he has become more like the fallen angel, lonely and cast away. When the creation speaks to Frankenstein for the first time, he exclaims what he has been through by telling Frankenstein, “Remember that I am thy creature; I ought to be thy Adam, but I am rather the fallen angel, whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed” after he was abandoned and forced to live on his own (Shelley 87). This is similar to Adam, who was created and then left to figure out life with no direction from his creator. Unlike Adam, however, the creation was given no one to comfort him. This instigates a world of sin and hatred for the creation. He becomes the fallen angel who is cast out of society by Frankenstein, who cannot bare to care for this “monster.” This allusion continues into the novel’s end when the creation sits next to Frankenstein’s deathbed and expresses to Walton how he felt, saying “But it is even so;…show more content…
The references made to Coleridge’s work through setting and description of loneliness advance the reader's thoughts about gothic heroes by coaxing readers to make inferences about the upcoming events for Walton. The continued allusion clarifies that in the end, Walton will end up like the Mariner, a troubled gothic hero. By developing the gothic hero in a subtle way, Shelley is able to gently assist readers in their understanding of the story, especially when she uses Genesis to further explain the creation’s actions. Through comparisons made between the creation, Adam, and the fallen angel, it is clear how the creation is classified as a gothic hero and why his actions are so intense. Due to his loneliness and inner torture, he cannot control his own violent impulses. As these allusions are repeated throughout the novel, readers notice their importance and can connect them to the troubled, lonely and sometimes villainous gothic heroes. There are more heroes to be recognized in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and these allusions, plus many more, continue to push readers to think deeper about the heroes and their
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