Gun Control Laws In The United States

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Today, one of our nation’s most frequently brought up issues is gun control. The United States has been relatively split by opinions regarding the topic. The threat of the misuse of guns has been widely debated by both the government and media for years now, and while many think otherwise, measures must be taken to ensure the safety of citizens and to control the amount of gun violence in our current society. By recent statistics, almost three-fourths of all homicides are associated with gunfire. While guns will most likely not be banned from general ownership because of the Second Amendment and the argument centered around it, stricter laws need to be put in place for the safety of gun owners and others alike. Those that are against any…show more content…
This is partially due to citizens being unaware of current statistics and conditions, as well as the fear of the government seizing guns acquired legally if certain bans are put into place. However, elections show that even among those against gun control, people do approve of some general regulations, like background checks and gun registration. Also, many approved of not allowing any past felons or anyone deemed mentally ill to own guns. No matter what the majority believes, however, the misuse of guns by unknowledgeable owners, not usually the guns themselves, endanger us. What many people do not understand is that gun control laws do not necessarily mean making guns illegal and banned from the possession of all citizens. If the laws in place now were followed and enforced the way that they were intended to be, then a stricter policy would not have been needed. By educating gun owners on how to safely use their weapons, many of the casualties coming from guns can be eliminated. If the appropriate steps are taken and we follow the laws meant to protect us, then certain bans and restrictions will not be necessary, and the number of gun homicides in our country would drastically

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