Handmaid's Tale Analysis

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The Handmaid’s Tale is based in a futuristic world and it contains a strictly enforced control. This system is called The Republic of Gilead. All must follow the rules set in Gilead and not dare to over step them. The laws are due to the decreasing number of fertile women and based on biblical teachings. Both men and women 's roles in this novel are significant with their responsibilities and actions. In this novel, handmaids are controlled in every aspect of life. Barely any freedom is given to the handmaids. The system has different roles for women, depending if they were fertile. The main role was a handmaid, who were the fertile women given to commanders. The commanders had wives; however, handmaids are created to complete the Christian…show more content…
When the Republic of Gilead is in progress of being created, the women were brainwashed to believe they are a problem in our world. Offred explains how a young girl told the story of her being raped in her childhood. An Aunt, the ones who help raise and teach the Handmaids the new role in life, ask the girl a unbelievable question. Then, the Aunt ask “But whose fault was it?” In a normal society the answer will always be the rapist; however, in the Republic of Gilead, it is the girl’s fault. Rape is never caused by the victim, no matter their appearance. A victim will be face many mental and emotional issues after this incident; therefore, who would wish this upon themselves? After the monthly ceremony, if a woman fails to get pregnant, she is blamed. Eventually, if she is unable to conceive a child, she is taken away and sent to the colonies with unwomen. After all the Handmaid is put through, the male is never blamed or questioned in the process. What if the man is infertile and is unable to have children? Maybe the doctor is right, is the Commander sterile? The women are taught that sterile men do not exist anymore. In this system, men are never questioned because it is believed that man has always been viewed as the superior
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