Harriet Stoowe's Impact On The 1800s

1823 Words8 Pages

Who is Harriet B. Stowe and what was her impact on the 1800’s? Well Harriet Beecher was born June 14th, 1811 in Litchfield, Connecticut. Harriet was one of the ten born to the well known preacher Lyman Beecher and his wife, Roxana Foote. She was nicknamed “Hattie” by her seven other brothers. During her young age, Harriet was exposed to huge debates in the state of Mississippi if it should be a slave state or not. Her father began preaching powerfully on slavery. At such a young age, Harriet was deeply affected by her father’s message. Also while she was young Stowe always kept her opinion very well known while she was with her family. The Beechers took in boarders from Tapping Reeve's law school. When Stowe was just seven years old she …show more content…

Stowe and what was her impact on the 1800’s? Well Harriet Beecher was born June 14th, 1811 in Litchfield, Connecticut. Harriet was one of the ten born to the well known preacher Lyman Beecher and his wife, Roxana Foote. She was nicknamed “Hattie” by her seven other brothers. During her young age, Harriet was exposed to huge debates in the state of Mississippi if it should be a slave state or not. Her father began preaching powerfully on slavery. At such a young age, Harriet was deeply affected by her father’s message. Also while she was young Stowe always kept her opinion very well known while she was with her family. The Beechers took in boarders from Tapping Reeve's law school. When Stowe was just seven years old she won an essay writing contest; writing has always been her strong foot. Stowe then attended an all girl school in Hartford, ran by her sister. After that, Stowe began getting her education at Sarah Pierce’s academy. Following that she also took classical learning courses that were originally reserved for men. By using her opinions and addressing the slavery issue through her writing, and encouraging abolishment, Harriet Stowe was an influential and impacting …show more content…

Later Uncle Tom’s Cabin was then published in book form in 1852. Though the novel is essentially inspired by the Fugitive Slave Act, she uses a lot of her own troubles experiences and emotion is this novel. Many called Uncle Tom’s Cabin an “anti slavery novel”. The target of the book was to educate northerners on the horrific things that happened in the South. She signed a contract with The National Era to “paint a picture of slavery” with Northerners. This book was an immediate bestseller and became popular in many countries. To be exact the book became a bestseller in the U.S, Britain, Europe, and Asia. The book was such a bestseller because Stowe caught the nation’s attention with her emotional description of the impact of slavery, predominantly on families and children. I wrote what I did because as a woman, as a mother, I was oppressed and broken-hearted with the sorrows and injustice I saw, because as a Christian I felt the dishonor to Christianity - because as a lover of my county, I trembled at the coming day of wrath." Stowe is just telling us that this book is written from her heart, and this book has so many strong emotions. The book had a strong ability to get readers to feel the same emotion as slaves and to display how families were affected by

Open Document