Harriet Tubm Former Slave And Agent On The Underground Railroad

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Harriet Tubman Harriet Tubman, known to most as a former slave and agent on the underground railroad, achieved much as an agent, spy, nurse, soldier, feminist, and social reformer, but unfortunately was treated with little respect, in return. Harriet Tubman has done a lot more for slaves, woman, elders, and the rest of this country than most people know. She led men into combat operations, she fought in the civil war, and she freed hundreds of slaves. Harriet Tubman was a right and just woman who never gave up or ran her train off tracks. Harriet Tubman's childhood was all work and no play. Foreseeably, there are no records of slave births, nor certificates marking the date. So, no one is positive what day Harriet Tubman was born, besides …show more content…

It was a secret network of Americans, black and white, who assisted slaves on their way to freedom. There was a code for the underground railroad so, no pro-slavery person would find out. Conductors were people who escorted slaves over roads. While the passengers were the escapee slaves. The stations were houses were escapee slaves could stay, and station masters were the people who owned the station houses. Harriet went on her way every night to the next station, until the night she made it to freedom. The following ten years that Harriet was free, she made around twenty trips from the north to the south to rescue more than three hundred slaves from slavery. During times like this one, Harriet would often carry a rifle as a symbol of encouragement to slaves, to encourage any faint-hearted slave on their journey to freedom, and to discourage pro-slavery. Her reputation became known fast, and soon afterwards a reward of forty-thousand dollars was posted for her capture. Constantly, proslavery writing criticized Harriet, as she worked to free more and more slaves. Eventually after freedom, Harriet …show more content…

Once to twice a year she would go north to south to north, again, rescuing slaves typically in the winter. The first time she was free she felt lost without family, so she began to work as a conductor on the underground railroad, a venture who earned the name “‘Moses’-emancipator of slaves.” Also, a biographer named Carl Conrad wrote, “her tales of adventure are beyond anything fiction and her ingenuity and generalship are extraordinary. I have known her for some time-the slaves call her Moses.” In 1875, in Philadelphia, Harriet Tubman was closely associated with anti-slavery organizations, such as, The Philadelphia Society For Promoting The Abolition Of Slavery, The Relief Of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held In Bodage, and Improving The Condition Of The African Race. Harriet Tubman, was also a soldier and a spy for General David Hunter. General Hunter wanted to hit the south in the financial heart-the cotton industry. In doing so, he sent Harriet to scout the region's largest cotton plantations. Harriet, disguised as a half-mad elderly woman, wandered over the property and was successful in her spy missions. She then reported details of the land back to General Hunter, who also instructed Harriet to spread word

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