Harriet Tubm The Pioneer Of The Underground Railroad

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Harriet Tubman is often considered one of the most influential African American women of all time. She’s been referred to as “Moses” for her perseverance and motivation for helping people. She’s most famously known as the conductor of the Underground Railroad. Harriet Tubman has pioneered an amazing journey from being born into slavery to tackling racial issues and freeing slaves. Harriet Tubman was born a slave in Dorchester County, Maryland around 1820-1822. Harriet was originally born as Araminta Ross but eventually changed her name to honor her mother, Harriet Green. Her mother worked as a cook in the plantation and her father, Benjamin Ross, was a timber worker. Her parents bore eight other children into slavery as well. Harriet began …show more content…

Her father was set free when she was eighteen years old. When her owner passed away, she was liberated with their last will. However, her new owner refused to let her go and Harriet was once again forced into slavery. Harriet was fearful that her new owners were going to sell her so she cultivated a plan. On September 17th, 1849, Harriet and two of her brothers tried to escape. Her brothers eventually turned back, forcing her with them. She ended up escaping by herself using the Underground Railroad to Philadelphia, …show more content…

The Underground Railroad was a network of safe houses and escape routes. It was established by white and black abolitionists for the purpose of getting slaves to freedom. Harriet utilized the network and made over a dozen journeys freeing friends, family, and strangers. In 1850 the Fugitive Slave Act was enacted to capture free black americans. This made it dangerous for the Underground Railroad in the north. The act also made Harriet more militant during her missions, such as carrying a firearm. Harriet Tubman took part in many great establishments, jobs, and protests. She saved an estimated 50 people from slavery using The Underground Railroad. Harriet quoted that she was “Never caught and never lost a passenger”. Harriet was later called into service as a union spy for the civil war due to her knowledge of transportation routes. She was known and respected as a guerrilla operative. She was also a union scout and an herbal-based nurse. Harriet remarried and had children with Nelson Davis. She joined the fight for women's suffrage alongside with campaigning for her and her deceased husband’s military pensions. She also established the Harriet Tubman Home for the Aged. Harriet eventually passed away in 1913 and was buried with military honors at Fort Hill Cemetery in Auburn, New York. She left a lasting legacy throughout her plethora of fights and protests for

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