Harrison Bergeron Equality Analysis

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We live in a volatile world; no one can begin to dispute such an evident truth. Sadly, in the pursuit of the stabilizing solution, a uniting solution, many well-meaning activists exacerbate the situation further. Tolerance is the war-cry of the modern activist; the ultimatum, equality, is goal claimed by the masses and an ideal for an entire generation to strive towards. But do we truly desire a world in which everyone is equal in fiscal status and before one another, a world where ethnicity, sex, and religion mean nothing? On an economic level, equality is not as beneficial as it first appears to be; in fact, it leaves much to be desired. It is true, socialist countries do, on average, have a lower unemployment rate than capitalist economies;…show more content…
These Amendments had created equality for all; however, it did not come in the ways people expected. “They were equal in every which way. Nobody was smarter than anybody else. Nobody was better looking than anybody else. Nobody was stronger or quicker than anybody else.” All citizens had to submit to devices from bags of lead balls, to weaken those of strength, to headphones to distract people with above average intelligence. The result was a world dim, without hope, without creativity, whose picturesque image of utopia was as depthless as the characters. There is no doubt the world this literary piece illustrates is not one any reasonable activist would profess to be his perception of Eden; and yet, it could be the ultimate end to the crusade for ultimate…show more content…
Sadly, because this nation and this world are corrupt and unethical, the equality we are striving for may never be a reality. Nevertheless, total equality is not necessarily in society’s best interest. When stripped of any and all the things which make us diverse, individuals lose their identity. What we, as the human race, have seemed to have forgotten is our differences are not a disgrace, a curse, or an abomination; instead, our differences are what define us as individuals. They give us our strength and individuality; our differences allow us to accomplish more as a collective than a world full of Da Vincis or Einsteins ever could. Individual uniqueness promotes diversity in every aspect of civilization. Maybe our world should rethink its ambitions for equality and, instead, endeavor to unify the populace amidst their differences. As the great Mahatma Gandhi put it, “Our ability to reach unity in diversity will be the beauty and the test of our
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