Harvey Mudd

1697 Words7 Pages
Society as a whole is inadvertently creating societal barriers at a young age for women who not only wish to pursue, but have an interest in male dominated roles. We can note this by changes in behavior towards young girls to young boys on their interests, and guiding them to more gender exclusive activities. From gathering information, we see the problem persist through higher education, and employment. You can be a female who is more qualified than a male for the same role, and studies on gender bias show that the male will still be chosen for the role over a female. You 'll rarely find people who will disagree with you that this social construct is a negative one, but it 's not just about identifying the problem, it 's about creating a…show more content…
Paying attention to Harvey Mudd College, a liberal arts college in California we see compelling evidence of just how successful women can be in STEM. In just five years, Harvey Mudd College dramatically increased the number of women computer science majors at the school by revising how we approach women to STEM fields. Harvey Mudd College was able to successfully integrate women into STEM fields by revising their required computer science course to emphasize broad application of computer science, and accommodate different levels of experience in technology. This wasn 't all Harvey Mudd College did though, they also provided students with early research opportunities, creating resources women are able to utilize for their course that they may otherwise not have been able to access. This is incredibly important in a bias field where men have more…show more content…
This is a partial truth. It 's true that women including those in leadership positions make different choices than men. Nearly four out of ten women at some point in their career have left the workforce voluntarily, and have reported taking jobs with less compensation and fewer responsibilities to accommodate family responsibilities. By contrast only one in ten men left the workforce for family related reasons. What drops this opt-out narrative though, is the subtle side of sexism. Women choose to leave their jobs or take less responsibilities because of the social narrative we 've portrayed to women that they have a responsibility to family
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