Henry VIII: The King Of The King

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Henry VIII, one of the Kings of England, was a prominent leader and his administration is still prevalent in ruins. A king known for the number of wives he had, Henry the VIII, was a product of man and a force of nature. Little do we know about the childhood of Henry, and his glory came into light after he ascended the throne. This happened after the death of his elder brother Arthur. When Arthur died in 1502, Henry was transported, figuratively speaking, from the back of the palace, where the Unneeded but not unimportant second son resided, to the throne room near the king he would soon succeed. But even as heir apparent, Henry seems never to have been given any responsibility for affairs of state nor was he allowed to be independent. Only…show more content…
It was a new church with no canons or rules in place other than the establishment of Henry VIII as Supreme Head of the Church of England. All the Pope’s power in England was lost with the passing of the Act of Supremacy by Parliament. This was not a great surprise to the King or the people around him. For several years leading up the to Act of Supremacy there had been actions taken by the King to remove some of the authority of the Pope and place the authority in the hands of the King. HENRY VIII CLAUSE In 1997, the (recently-abolished) Scrutiny of Legislation Committee of the Queensland Parliament published a report entitled The use of "Henry VIII Clauses" in Queensland Legislation. That report contained the following definition of “Henry VIII” clauses: A Henry VIII clause is a clause of an Act of Parliament which enables the Act to be expressly or impliedly amended by subordinate legislation or Executive action. This means that an executive, can amend any Primary (Acts and statutes) and Secondary (Ordinances and notifications) without going through the procedure of Parliament and introduction of amendment bill. Henry VIII powers provide the executive with a power to override primary legislation by way of delegated legislation. Essentially, it gives the executive, the power to modify any law enacted by the…show more content…
Subordinate legislation is made by the Executive. The form and the date when subordinate legislation takes effect are entirely within the power of the Executive. The Legislative Assembly has no control over the form of subordinate legislation or when it takes effect. The Legislative Assembly’s principal power in relation to subordinate legislation is the capacity to disallow it. If disallowance occurs, it occurs only after the subordinate legislation will have been in force for (probably) several months. The practical significance of Henry VIII clauses lies in the loss of the public scrutiny and accountability for policy decisions that would usually occur when primary legislation is made by Parliament. In other words, matters of policy can be determined by the executive without the effective scrutiny of Parliament. DELEGATED
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