Theseus And The Minotaur Analysis

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Theseus and the Minotaur Fear. Heroism. Danger. In the Theseus story, King Minos of Crete was a powerful man, feared by the rulers of the lands around him. When he demanded goods or men for his great armies, they felt they had to agree. When he demanded they send tributes to honour him, they sent them without question. It was the only way they could stop him going to war with them. But his demands on Athens became too much for them to bear. This hold over the ancient Greek world ended, because one lone man named Theseus stepped in and stopped it. Although some question Theseus’ honor, he is considered to be a Greek hero; however, Theseus exhibited the qualities of a true Greek hero of bravery, sacrifice, and strength. First, when King Midos had a giant palace…show more content…
As the animal grew weak, Theseus gave one almighty tug on the head, turning it almost right around. The creature 's neck snapped, it gurgled its last breath and fell to the floor with an enormous thud. It was over, he had done it. The Minotaur was dead. All he had to do was make his way out of...and then he realised the awful truth. In the struggle, he had let go of the string, his lifeline. Theseus felt all over the floor in the pitch darkness and kept thinking he had found it, only to realise that he all he had was a long wiry hair from the Minotaur. Despair set in and Theseus wondered if this was where his life would end, down in the dark, all alone, next to the stinking body. Then, his hand brushed a piece of string and, with a whoop of delight, he knew he had found the thread which would lead him back out. As he neared the entrance of the labyrinth, the darkness began to fade and he made out the figure of Ariadne, waiting for his return. "You must take me back to Athens with you," she cried, "My father will kill me when he finds out that I have helped you." "But of course you must come with us," said Theseus, "it would be cruel to
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