The Hero In Joseph Campbell's Monomyth

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Fred Rogers once said “I am always comforted by realizing that there are still so many helpers - so many caring people in this world.” In this quote, he analyzed the nature of helping as well as the number of like-minded people in the world. He explained that the helpers were more important than anything else to a hero. The Hero’s Journey, derived from Joseph Campbell’s Monomyth tells the structure and stages that a hero must go through to achieve their goal. The most important aspect of the Monomyth would be the support from the Helper since there would not be a way for the hero to learn from experiences and receive guidance. In the popular book Eragon, by Christopher Paolini, it talks of the hero Eragon who goes on a journey to exact revenge…show more content…
Brom is the storyteller of his town who accompanies Eragon on the journey. Brom teaches him many things about magic, history of the land, and other important information. Without this information, Eragon would have not been able to survive since much of this information is meant to stop Eragon from rushing into danger without caution. Brom mentions this usage of caution on page 138 where he states, “Using magic to heal a wound takes just as much energy as it would to mend on its own. You shouldn’t attempt such a difficult task yet.” Another situation where Brom helps Eragon is during the growth of Saphira, his new dragon. Brom teaches Eragon how to ride, care, and communicate with her. As the rider and the dragon train and grow stronger, Brom helps in the planning process to take revenge on the Ra’zac who killed Eragon’s uncle. This plan involved looking for the shipment of Sethr oil that the Ra’zac loved to use as a weapon. They concluded that the city with the most number of shipments would be the location of the Ra’zac. Brom was the one who explained to him the steps that were needed to achieve the goal. When Eragon was confused, Brom reminded him that "Of course you don't [understand]. That's why I'm teaching you and not the other way around.” (297) which shows Brom’s technique and strategy when teaching Eragon. This seemed to work as Eragon understood the meaning behind his…show more content…
He [appears] to be a few years older than Eragon and perhaps an inch or so taller." (389) Paolini describes Murtagh in the same manner as he does with Eragon simulating a similarity between the two young men. Murtagh fights and travels alongside Eragon. There are many situations during this endeavour where Murtagh helps Eragon. One occurrence was during the fight in the city of Gil’ead where Brom takes a dagger. Murtagh is inferred as the one who fires the arrows at the Ra’zac forcing them to flee. Later on, Murtagh tends to the two men as they recover from the battle. Without the help of Murtagh in this situation, Eragon and Brom would not have been able to escape the Ra’zac grasps as easily since they were tied up. Murtagh also realizes that Eragon needs more training in swordplay and begins sparring with him. This mutually strengthens their skills since they are evenly matched. They are similar enough that they tire at the same rate. Murtagh and Eragon are described as similar in terms of skills, but Paolini creates a significant difference so that Murtagh is able to assist many of Eragon’s weaker traits and save him from many occasions. This proves irreplaceable when Murtagh saves Eragon once again in Chapter 41. Eragon is thrown in jail by the dark magician or Shade known as Durza and drugged. Murtagh saves him dressed as an old travelling wanderer.
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