Herzberg Theory: Employee Motivation And Job Satisfaction

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Herzberg a psychologist, proposed a theory called motivation – hygiene theory conducted in the 1950s that refers to the factors that motivate employees care (Ahmad and Azumah, 2012). He established motivators and hygiene factor care (Ahmad and Azumah, 2012). Motivators include include achievement, recognition, nature of the work, responsibility and career progression care (Ahmad and Azumah, 2012). While the hygiene factors include policy, supervision, interpersonal relations, working conditions, and salary care (Ahmad and Azumah, 2012). In contrast, the hygiene factors are dissatisfied of job satisfaction fortunately their absence doesn’t affect job satisfaction care (Ahmad and Azumah, 2012). Burton (2012) agreed with the Herzberg theory…show more content…
Certainly, these goals can be accomplished by the rewards of the organisation (Parijat and Bagga, 2014). Therefore, it is an important factor of value in how organisational rewards satisfies the needs of an employee in order to achieve employees personal goals (Parijat and Bagga, 2014). Alternatively, organisation may reward employees based on the production output are dependent on the employee performance (Parijat and Bagga, 2014). He recognised that an employee's performance is established on individual factors such as personality, skills, knowledge, experience and abilities (Mary, 2010). He stated that there is a positive relationship between employee performance and motivation which includes four variables, namely, the employee effort, employee performance, organsational rewards or work outcomes and personal goals (Parijat and Bagga, 2014). The theory stated that the employees desire that their performance met the organisational rewards that will ultimately lead to higher salary, bonuses and promotions. Mary (2010) opined that this theory aids employers to know how employees viewed the organisation during the exit…show more content…
Some of these factors are proper compensation and rewards, security of job, training and developments, effective supervisor support and the organisation culture (Das and Baruah, 2013). According to Ostertaker 1999 cited by Das and Baruah (2013) agreed with this argument and stated that happy and satisfied employees and retention are vital for the success of any organisation. Furthermore, Walker 2001 cited by Das and Baruah (2013) highlighted seven salient strategies to retain employees. This includes compensation and appreciation of the duties carried out, provision of hard tasks, opportunities for promotion, welcoming working environment, good relationship between team members, a healthy work and personal life balance and finally effective communications. On the contrary, Chamberlain (2017) carried out a study at the Glassdoor Company by reviewing over 5,000 resumes to ascertain the motive for job change from a test of thousands of resumes from 2007 to 2016 revealed that “work-life balance doesn’t have any statistical link to whether employees stay or leave”(Chamberlain, 2017 par 12). It actually contributes to employee happiness, but really doesn’t impact much for turnover in comparison to other factors. Essentially, often times employees choose to leave their jobs for
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