Heutagogy: Self-Regulated Learning

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Heutagogy “Heutagogy is the study of self-determined learning … It is also an attempt to challenge some ideas about teaching and learning that still prevail in teacher centred learning and the need for, as Bill Ford (1997) eloquently puts it ‘knowledge sharing’ rather than ‘knowledge hoarding’. In this respect heutagogy looks to the future in which knowing how to learn will be a fundamental skill given the pace of innovation and the changing structure of communities and workplaces.” In self-determined learning, it is important that learners acquire both competencies and capabilities (Stephenson, 1994 as cited in McAuliffe et al., 2008, p. 3; Hase & Kenyon, 2000, 2007). Competency can be understood as proven ability in acquiring knowledge…show more content…
It means that the older you are, the more you were already developed and matured enough to handle certain problems in a real life situation. In addition to this, the academic performance inside the classroom is tending to be high if students are old enough. In contrast, DeMeis & Stearns (1992) and Dietz & Wilson (1985) found no significant relationship between age and…show more content…
Visual learning strategies such as graphical representation, outlines and diagrams are being used in the classroom right now. Through these different strategies, the visual learners can easily acquire the knowledge they need and as well as the learning outcomes that they should have to achieve. The presence of visual elements in today’s teaching and learning is increasing as the integration of images and visual presentations with text in textbooks, instructional manuals, classroom presentations, and computer interfaces broadens (Benson, 1997; Branton, 1999; Dwyer as cited in Kleinman & Dwyer, 1999). Although the educational community is embracing visual enhancements in instruction, the connection of visual and verbal information is evident throughout history. According to the poet Simonides, “Words are the images of things” (as cited in Benson, p. 141); similarly, Aristotle stated that, “without image, thinking is impossible” (as cited in Benson, p. 141). Characters in alphabets began as pictures with meaning (West,
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