High School Dropouts Thesis Statement

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High School Dropouts
Neil Urbano
DeVry University
High School Dropouts

I. Introduction

A. Thesis Statement: High School students who dropouts matters after they exit school because there is a direct and negative impact on life outcome, the labor market opportunities are limited, and there are disadvantages that leads to poverty.

1) Main Idea: High School students who dropouts matters after they exit school because there is a direct and negative impact on life outcome.

2) Main Idea: High School students who dropouts matters after they exit school because the labor market opportunities are limited.

3) Main Idea: High School students who dropouts matters after they exit school because there are disadvantages that leads to poverty.

II. Main
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Identify why the main idea opposes your thesis statement.
The main idea fully supports the thesis statement and its position that high school dropout matters. In the three main ideas mentioned not one opposes the thesis statement.

B. Provide evidence that will oppose your thesis statement. (Write one sentence summary ideas based on research that you have conducted. Also provide the APA citation and reference. Use at least 1 reference per main idea.)
New ideas and luck could prevent high school dropouts to live a life in poverty. Anyone who engage in business, or as an employee and supported by a good economic trend may put a high school dropout in a good position in the society.

“Similarly, some scholars argue that a healthy local labor market and increases in the minimum wage can pull students out of school. Specifically, if the local labor market offers strong economic opportunities for people without a high school diploma, students will have a greater incentive to drop out (McNeal 2011). Researchers have applied a similar logic to increases in the minimum wage–if the minimum wage increases, high school dropouts can earn more, which will make dropping out more attractive–but there is strong evidence that increases in the minimum wage do not lead to increases in high school dropout rates (Warren and Hamrock
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