Hiroshima Bombing Geoffrey Shepherd Summary

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In response to Geoffrey Shepherds article about the bombings in world war two. He tries to support, connect, and persuade this audience that the atomic bomb should have never been dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Geoffrey Shepherd tries to create an emotional appeal to convince the audience that the atomic bomb should have not been dropped. “One early study estimated 40,000 American soldiers death, yet President Harry Truman and others soon spoke of ‘half a million’.” That being said, that’s not even the exact number. It’s just an estimate, to get people amazed and betrayed by Harry Truman because it was supposedly half a million. “The hellish firebombing of Tokyo in March 1945 killed some 250,000 civilians and maimed huge numbers more.” although this is not about Hiroshima or Nagasaki, it 's still pretty tragic that the U.S. did that. Why couldn’t they just settle down and sort things out? By using pathos, Shepherd is able to appeal to the readers emotions through his words and possibilities. Shepherd uses statics, trying to persuade the readers that the bombings weren’t necessary. “The bombings probably killed more than 200,000…show more content…
Geoffrey Shepherd also tries to create an ethical appeal to try to convince the reader by giving examples of how the US could’ve solved their issues with the Japanese Army. “Properly used as threats to ensure quick surrender, the A-Bombs could have prevented all further deaths in Japan-- of Americans, Japanese, and any others…” Shepherd is using ethos to try and persuade the audience that the US had better alternatives that could have prevented the deaths and fighting. “Had the US instead fired a warning shot by dropping an A-bomb in Tokyo Bay, scarcely a soul would’ve died”, the type of tone that is set here is that he is trying to create the feeling of “the right thing to do”. By using ethos, Geoffrey is able to use tone and persuade the audience with his words that they could’ve stopped the bombings in Hiroshima and
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