History Of Women's Suffrage

1320 Words6 Pages
CHAPLIN
TO
CHURCHILL

INTRODUCTION
There was a time when women used to face many problems while living in the society. However, this trend has been changed but women have to follow various tactics in order to maintain harmony in the society and to stay at par with men. It took a lot for them to resolve the struggles of equal rights and to implement the same in real world without giving rise to any controversy. A few years ago women were never seen in influential roles due to many discriminatory factors but now the whole era has been changed and many women can be seen performing really well even better than men. This only has become possible due to the hardships faced by women in old times and how they fought for their rights
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When we go back to 19th century that was the time when it was witnessed that the male suffrage was prevailing in a number of countries and women suffrage was not there and somehow it ignited a spark among women to fight for themselves and for their rights so that they could be treated as humans and not as animals. In the year 1893, women were able to achieve equal voting rights at national level in New Zealand. The same pattern was followed in Australia in 1902. However, in America, England and Canada women could achieve same voting rights only after the First World War ended. Then came into being the famous movement called The Suffrage Movement during which the women fought for their equal voting rights which all men were enjoying at that time because they were of the view that they were a part of the society too and they deserve all the rights to elect their representatives. This movement was started in 1848 and it ended in 1920. It continued for quite a long time and women had to face many hardships to fight for their own rights. But the period still could not end up in signing of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. During the whole period of 1920, women had put their emphasis on promoting the status of…show more content…
Recalling the time, in 1920, however, many organizations related to rights of women and fighting for their rights joined hands together and formed a committee called the Women's Joint Congressional Committee to refine the laws related to women empowerment and equal voting rights to women. This helped to build a strong social status of women and helped them to live in society with dignity. The committee succeeded in bringing many legislations related to women upfront like plans related to mothers, educational facilities for women, laws for curbing child labor and the Sheppard-Towner Act of 1921, which provided federal funds to a number of states for introducing and improving health programs for the benefit of children and
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