Hitler's Execution Essay: The Nuremberg Trials During World War II

664 Words3 Pages
The Nuremberg Trials were a series of trials held over the course of eleven months in which the Allies prosecuted German military leaders and officials for the crimes they had committed during World War II. Although many people believe that the Nuremberg Trials were biased and unfair, the trials were necessary to achieve justice and punish the top Nazis for their war crimes.
In the late 1930s, Adolf Hitler began to gain power in Germany. He promised to change the social and economic problems caused by Germany’s debts due to reprimand payments for their loss during World War I. By blaming the Jews for Germany’s economic crisis and their defeat in World War I, Hitler was able to target the Jews as the country’s main enemy. According to him, the Jews were liable for many of Germany’s issues. As Hitler’s following grew, so did his power over Germany. During his time in power, over six million Jews were killed in execution camps. Many people helped Hitler to
…show more content…
It was made up of one judge and an alternate, as well as a prosecutor from each of the four main Allies. The IMT drew up criminal charges on four counts, one through four respectivly: common plan or conspiracy, crimes against peace, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. These charged were placed upon twenty-four of the most senior and influential military, political, media, and business leaders of the Third Reich. Although twenty-four men were charged with these crimes, only twenty-one were tried at Nuremberg. Robert Ley, head of the German labor front, committed suicide before the trials began. Gustav Krupp, a factory owner who employed thousand of slaves in his factories, was deemed unfit for trial because of his physical and mental condition. Martin Borman, Hitler’s second in command, was ordered to flee Germany in order to avoid capture. He was tried in absentia and found guilty on counts one, three and
Open Document